The Story of PFC LaVena Johnson on The Rock Newman Show

Published on 11 Feb 2016
Many have heard about the efforts for justice in the case of Army PFC LaVena Johnson. In 2005 after only 6 weeks of her deployment in Iraq, PFC LaVena Johnson was found dead. The Army says suicide, but after close evaluation and discovering a plethora of discrepancies in the Army’s report, LaVena’s father Dr. John H. Johnson began the fight for justice for his daughter. On this episode of The Rock Newman Show our special guest are LaVena’s father, Dr. John H. Johnson and attorney Donald V. Watkins. We warn our viewers that this episode of The Rock Newman Show goes into deep detail concerning the evidence and death of PFC LaVena Johnson. Dr. John H. Johnson and Donald V. Watkins contend that by no means is this case a suicide, and say they even know the name of the culprit.

Published on 6 May 2009

Part 2    Part 3    Part 4     Part 5

 
http://non-combat-death.org/SurnamesJ… http://www.marieclaire.com/world-repo… Shortly after midnight on July 19, 2005, a shift supervisor at a military cafeteria in Balad, Iraq, hears a loud bang that sounds like a car backfiring and races to the tent where it came from. He looks inside. Private First Class LaVena Johnson, 19, a vegan and an honor-roll student who once dreamed of going to film school in Los Angeles, is dead of a gunshot wound to the head. She is lying on a bed of rocky soil, with gashes on both sides of her mouth; her hair is tangled in the dirt. An M16 is lying on the ground beside her. A Bible, a package of M&Ms, and a pack of Marlboro Lights are also near her body. Today, more than three years later, LaVena’s parents, Dr. John and Linda Johnson, are still looking for answers. Who killed their daughter? Officials at the Army Criminal Investigation Command spent nine months on the case. They closed the investigation on April 28, 2006, ruling LaVena’s death a suicide. Her file is “inches thick,” says spokesman Chris Grey. “We stand by our investigation.” But LaVena’s father says the Army is lying–he thinks his daughter was murdered. She showed no signs of wanting to kill herself during the two months she spent in Iraq; two days before she died, LaVena told her father she was coming home in November to get the house ready for Christmas. “Don’t start decorating without me,” she said. Johnson isn’t the only one questioning the suicide ruling. Ann Wright, a retired Army colonel and former diplomat who has written about LaVena for the political website TruthOut, is among hundreds of people who have signed a petition (lavenajohnson.com) demanding that the Army reopen the investigation. “They need to get to the bottom of whether she was a suicide or murder victim,” Wright says. Meanwhile, at a hearing before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform in April 2007, Congressman William Lacy Clay Jr. (D–MO) said the Johnson family has been “met by a wall of disrespect, evasion, and a failure to provide them with the answers that the parents of any fallen soldier deserve.” Now, as a result of pressure from Congressman Clay and the Johnson family, officials “are looking into the case,” according to a House Armed Services Committee spokeswoman, to determine if they should pursue a formal investigation of the matter. 3
http://non-combat-death.org/SurnamesJ… http://www.marieclaire.com/world-repo… Shortly after midnight on July 19, 2005, a shift supervisor at a military cafeteria in Balad, Iraq, hears a loud bang that sounds like a car backfiring and races to the tent where it came from. He looks inside. Private First Class LaVena Johnson, 19, a vegan and an honor-roll student who once dreamed of going to film school in Los Angeles, is dead of a gunshot wound to the head. She is lying on a bed of rocky soil, with gashes on both sides of her mouth; her hair is tangled in the dirt. An M16 is lying on the ground beside her. A Bible, a package of M&Ms, and a pack of Marlboro Lights are also near her body. Today, more than three years later, LaVena’s parents, Dr. John and Linda Johnson, are still looking for answers. Who killed their daughter? Officials at the Army Criminal Investigation Command spent nine months on the case. They closed the investigation on April 28, 2006, ruling LaVena’s death a suicide. Her file is “inches thick,” says spokesman Chris Grey. “We stand by our investigation.” But LaVena’s father says the Army is lying–he thinks his daughter was murdered. She showed no signs of wanting to kill herself during the two months she spent in Iraq; two days before she died, LaVena told her father she was coming home in November to get the house ready for Christmas. “Don’t start decorating without me,” she said. Johnson isn’t the only one questioning the suicide ruling. Ann Wright, a retired Army colonel and former diplomat who has written about LaVena for the political website TruthOut, is among hundreds of people who have signed a petition (lavenajohnson.com) demanding that the Army reopen the investigation. “They need to get to the bottom of whether she was a suicide or murder victim,” Wright says. Meanwhile, at a hearing before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform in April 2007, Congressman William Lacy Clay Jr. (D–MO) said the Johnson family has been “met by a wall of disrespect, evasion, and a failure to provide them with the answers that the parents of any fallen soldier deserve.” Now, as a result of pressure from Congressman Clay and the Johnson family, officials “are looking into the case,” according to a House Armed Services Committee spokeswoman, to determine if they should pursue a formal investigation of the matter.

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